skip to Main Content

Welcome to Perma Laboratories
EST. 1986

Home of Perma Soft, the Professional Denture Reline Kit that’s Now Available for Denture Wearers in need of a Denture Reliner. We also carry other professional

products for dentures, such as our New ProSoft Denture Reline Kit, Denture Repair Kits and Denture Cleaning Tablets.

There is a lot of Important Denture Information here to look at. Just click on the links below for all the denture information and our two types of denture reline kits.

For Customer Service Call 1-800-988-9194
Canada Customers, Call 1-866-791-7778

Received the perma soft liner material and its every bit as good as you say,followed enclosed instructions and received a $250.00 reline for $20.00. Thanks for a great product.

John

5.0
2018-11-29T14:39:27+00:00

John

Received the perma soft liner material and its every bit as good as you say,followed enclosed instructions and received a $250.00 reline for $20.00. Thanks for a great product.
Dear Mick, This morning I used your reline product as it was time for this to be done after a year of wearing a new denture. I had been given prices for this procedure of anywhere from 278.00 to 350.00 which is tough in todays economy. The product was easy to apply and so far it has made such a difference. Cant believe how great it is. Does the reliner have a shelf life? I would like to order a couple more for the closet but hesitate if there is a time when it wont be able to be used. Again a great great product. Thanks

Rob Fitzgerald

5.0
2018-11-29T14:52:31+00:00

Rob Fitzgerald

Dear Mick, This morning I used your reline product as it was time for this to be done after a year of wearing a new denture. I had been given prices for this procedure of anywhere from 278.00 to 350.00 which is tough in todays economy. The product was easy to apply and so far it has made such a difference. Cant believe how great it is. Does the reliner have a shelf life? I would like to order a couple more for the closet but hesitate if there is a time when it wont be able to be used. Again a great great product. Thanks
Hi Mick, After we got back from vacation, it had arrived and yesterday, I put it in following the instructions. I must say, ITS GREAT!!!! Your kit has it all over "denture rite". I am going to order another kit just to have in case. Thanks I just want to send an email and thank you! This is the best thing I have ever bought in my life. Instant relief from the pain the dentures were causing me. I will reccomend you product to every one. Thank you.

Rebecca Duda

5.0
2018-11-29T14:54:31+00:00

Rebecca Duda

Hi Mick, After we got back from vacation, it had arrived and yesterday, I put it in following the instructions. I must say, ITS GREAT!!!! Your kit has it all over "denture rite". I am going to order another kit just to have in case. Thanks I just want to send an email and thank you! This is the best thing I have ever bought in my life. Instant relief from the pain the dentures were causing me. I will reccomend you product to every one. Thank you.
your shippment arrived and has been used...you have a superior product.....free advice is worth what you pay for it, but here goes.....give every order you ship the opportunity to place a standing order with for, say, every 12 month....which you ship.....thanks again for such prompt service.....

Ria H.

5.0
2018-11-29T14:55:28+00:00

Ria H.

your shippment arrived and has been used...you have a superior product.....free advice is worth what you pay for it, but here goes.....give every order you ship the opportunity to place a standing order with for, say, every 12 month....which you ship.....thanks again for such prompt service.....
Hi Perma Laboratories, just want to drop you a line saying i'm on my second year wearing Perma Soft II now and my dentures still fit great. Never thought it would last this long, your product is a Godsend maybe i can get a couple more years out of this one reline. Please stay in business.Thanks a million

Bob K.

5.0
2018-11-29T14:56:14+00:00

Bob K.

Hi Perma Laboratories, just want to drop you a line saying i'm on my second year wearing Perma Soft II now and my dentures still fit great. Never thought it would last this long, your product is a Godsend maybe i can get a couple more years out of this one reline. Please stay in business.Thanks a million
Hi Mick, What a great product. After my order, it arrived here in Georgetown, ON, Canada within days. I followed the instructions very carefully and I am totally satisfied with the product and the success with it. Your company has saved me hundreds of dollars to get a re-line at my dentist. I also now save a lot of money by not having to purchase the store bought liners that you have to put on every day. All the best to you all for having a super product that saves money for us wearing dentures. Also, there are no custom duties or extra charges when sending your product to Canada. Keep up the good work to save consumers money.

Doug

5.0
2018-11-29T14:57:13+00:00

Doug

Hi Mick, What a great product. After my order, it arrived here in Georgetown, ON, Canada within days. I followed the instructions very carefully and I am totally satisfied with the product and the success with it. Your company has saved me hundreds of dollars to get a re-line at my dentist. I also now save a lot of money by not having to purchase the store bought liners that you have to put on every day. All the best to you all for having a super product that saves money for us wearing dentures. Also, there are no custom duties or extra charges when sending your product to Canada. Keep up the good work to save consumers money.
Order arrived today, and I immediately put it to use when I came home. Since Denturite liner never lasted more than a week, even a month is still a big savings to me. The prospect of having the liner work even a few months is more than enough for me to call your product worth it.

Howard Shirk

5.0
2018-11-29T14:58:00+00:00

Howard Shirk

Order arrived today, and I immediately put it to use when I came home. Since Denturite liner never lasted more than a week, even a month is still a big savings to me. The prospect of having the liner work even a few months is more than enough for me to call your product worth it.
Hi Mick, thanks for processing my order. I used your liner 2-3 years ago with super results! I do have a question, what can I use to remove the old liner, or can I just apply another layer over the old? Answer: yes apply the new liner over top of the old, it is mostly worn out by now anyway and the new liner will stick to it great. Thanks for your advice!

Haya

5.0
2018-11-29T14:58:19+00:00

Haya

Hi Mick, thanks for processing my order. I used your liner 2-3 years ago with super results! I do have a question, what can I use to remove the old liner, or can I just apply another layer over the old? Answer: yes apply the new liner over top of the old, it is mostly worn out by now anyway and the new liner will stick to it great. Thanks for your advice!
Hi Mick, I just wanted to say "Thank You" for a great product, Perma Soft Denture Reline Kit at an affordable price! I've been wearing dentures for almost 50 years and this is the first time that a reline has ever been easy and right the first try. Thank you very much!

CB

5.0
2018-11-29T14:58:45+00:00

CB

Hi Mick, I just wanted to say "Thank You" for a great product, Perma Soft Denture Reline Kit at an affordable price! I've been wearing dentures for almost 50 years and this is the first time that a reline has ever been easy and right the first try. Thank you very much!
5
9

Denture Reline Kits for Loose Denutres

Denture Repair Kits with Denture Teeth Explained

Denture Relining

ProSoft Denture Reline Kit

When Adhesives, Powders and Cushions Just Aren’t Enough

A denture reline is adding a denture material to a denture and placing it into your mouth to fill in the empty space between the denture and the natural gums for a secure fit.

When Is a Denture Reline Needed?

A reline is needed when dentures become loose and irritating and no longer fit, you can do your own reline with a reline kit or you can have it done by a dentist at a greater cost. There’s no need to go without wearing your dentures when you can easily have them relined in the dentist office or purchase a at-home denture reliner at an affordable price.

Relining Your Own Loose Dentures is Easy and Simple

Loose Dentures are usually caused by wear (denture wear and gum wear) of your old dentures and weight lost is also a major factor in loose dentures. Losing a few pounds can affect the fit of your denture and there’s nothing worse than wobbling dentures when it comes to eating or speaking.

Denture Liners

A denture liner is a denture adhesive pad or reline material, to put in a dentures to add retention to help hold the denture in place . Liners are needed when your false teeth become loose and irritating causing sore spots.  With the help of a denture liner, liners can temporarily hold dentures in place. A more permanent way without using temporary liners is to reline dentures with a do it yourself reline kit.  Liner pads or cushions are fine for short time relief.

Are Dentures Affordable?

Affordable dentures can be bought almost everywhere but make sure they are the quality you expect before you buy check around for the best affordable prices.  Some companies offer bargain dentures.  They fit, but not good quality.  They’ll ask you if you want to upgrade for better dentures.  Just shop around.  There are also many mail-order denture labs that can make your denture by sending you an impression kit.  Once the lab receives the impression kit, they will fabricate a new denture by using the impression of your gums.

Denture Adhesives

Denture adhesive pads, denture adhesive powders, adhesive paste and  cushions that are placed into a denture to hold it temporarily in place.  There’s not a whole lot we can say about denture adhesive besides another alternative is to reline dentures using a denture reliner kit or reline your dentures through a dentist.  Adhesives are a short-term fix only and help hold dentures in place that are in need relining.

There are many denture adhesive product materials out there to chose. We carry denture reline kits here not denture adhesive or adhesives.

Soft Denture Reline

Soft Denture Reline: Professional Soft Denture Reline Kits now available for Public use. Soft liner, Soft liners are great for your gums. Soft Reliners are all made of a soft denture material.  As a result, they protect the natural gums from hard plastic dentures.   See our instructions for our ProSoft denture reline kit.   They are also used on denture wearers who have no gum structures and are great for new denture wearers who are suffering from sore gums and rapid gum loss.

If you want a comfortable fit than using a soft liner liners or a soft denture reline is the way to go.  Soft denture relines feel great on gums and provide a snug fit. Soft denture relines are getting more popular than ever and will remain so because of the soft comfortable a soft denture reliner gives the denture wearer. We carry soft reline material kits here, not adhesive, liners or liner.  All of our product instructions can be found here.

denture-repair-kit-with-teeth

Repair your own dentures with PERK Denture Repair Kit

What is a Denture Repair Kit?

A denture repair is fixing broken dentures or replacing missing or worn parts of a denture (reuniting). You can repair a denture with a DIY repair kit. A denture repair kit contains denture material and instructions which will allow you to repair your denture at home. You can also have a dentist fix your broken dentures, which usually takes a day or so to be repaired by a dentist.  Or you can fix your own broken denutre with a denture repair kit in and hour or so.

When to repair your denture?

Dentures require repairs when they are broken, cracked or are missing teeth on the dentures that need fixing or a repair.

Denture Repairs means you have more than one repair on your denture to fix.  Like your denture is cracked and has missing teeth so denture repairs must be made by a dentist or a do-it-yourself denture repair kit.

We carry repairs kits here.

What’s Included in a Denture Repair Kit?

A Denture Repair Kit is a kit containing items or packaged acrylic denture materials and tools ready to fix the broken or missing worn parts of a denture and a repair kit is used by the denture wearer to repair his broken teeth.  Our kits include denture teeth in case your original tooth is lost or missing from your denture plate.

 To view our instructions click here.

Dentures Adhesive

Don’t Eat It!

denture adhesives, building reliner with adhesives

Denture Adhesive

What denture relines have in common with denture adhesives. Denture adhesives are needed when dentures become loose and irritating. This could be caused by loss of weight or by getting your dentures made to soon. Either way you’re now going to have to wear a denture adhesive to keep your dentures in place and adhesive is not really the way to go.

Types of Denture Adhesives

There are many types of denture adhesive on the market, pads, paste, powders, strips etc. Each denture wearer has plenty of adhesives to pick from until he or she finds the best fit. Dentures are hard to get to get used to wearing.

Wear and Tear on Your Gums

Dentures are more apt to become loose with time.  Your dentures will wear and also your gums will wear from the hard plastic dentures. Today in modern dentistry they have a soft denture reline material for a more comfortable denture fit and less stress on your gums which is a great relief for denture wearers. Dentures adhesive are fine, but they are only a temporary fix and it has to be used over and over on dentures daily.

What is dentures adhesive?

Nothing more than a stick’em (glue) which is applied to dentures to temporarily hold them in place. The problem with adhesive is that it becomes a daily routine which becomes a hassle to deal with daily, an alternative to adhesives is a denture reline which should end the daily routine of dentures adhesives.

What are Dentures?

Dentures are artificial appliances to replace natural teeth that have been extracted from mouth. Dentures why, dentures are needed to get you partialy back to the way you were before your teeth were pulled. Dentures where, dentures can be obtained through a dentist or a licensed denturist in a few states. Mostly in the northwestern states and Canada. You can get dentures for a lot less through a denturist than you can a dentist. Denturists make dentures for the dentist and have more knowledge of making dentures than a dentist since that is their specialty.

To find out more about professional dentures relines and dentures repair kits click on link above.

Messy Denture Adhesives

Denture Adhesive is messy and you can end up swallowing most of it before the end of the day. It does hold for awhile, but in a few hours it starts to dissolve and then it starts to ooze out from under your Dentures into your saliva and down your throat.

Now you have the hassle of changing your Adhesive while trying to get the old out and applying new again.

Try Our Perma Soft Denture Reline

as an Alternative to Denture Adhesives

PERMA SOFT RELINE is ONLY applied ONCE for a Soft but Firm comfortable and reliable fit that FEELS GREAT on your Gums. FEELS GREATlasts up to 2 years with just ONE APPLICATION (See our customer testimonials) with no daily, messy adhesive. PERMA SOFT can be added right over top of the old reliner when it begins to wear out. Furthermore, NO EATING denture adhesive ALL DAY LONG.

Now you can make a comparison between Denture Adhesive and Perma Soft Denture Reline.

Powders and paste can be very useful in maintaining stability of dentures, but they only works for short periods of time. Having to wear adhesive means you either have no gum structure or your dentures need to be relined or you need new dentures. Adhesive can’t cure this so a reline would be the first step of ending adhesive use. Again denture adhesive is only a temporary fix so why not reline your dentures easily and inexpensively until you can see your dentist with Perma Soft and rid yourself of misery.

Adhesives powders, paste and cushions can get expensive after a few months using it over and over again. Some denture wearers can’t use paste or powders because it makes them gag, but all denture wearers and all adhesives are not alike. So which type of adhesive should you use? Good question. The best way to answer that is not to use adhesive at all and reline your dentures with Perma Soft or have your dentures relined by a dentist.

 

Denture adhesive can’t be good for you if used month after month year after year. So don’t use denture adhesive if you can get by without it.

More information on Dentures and Professional Denture Products on ABOVE links.

WARNING: Although Perma Soft lasts up to 2 years, FDA advises that this product should be considered a temporary solution until a dentist can be seen. Keep regular dental appointments for proper fitting dentures.

Use of Denture Adhesives

Complete denture treatment needs to be customized for each patient’s particular needs. Successful treatment combines exemplary technique, effective patient rapport and education, and familiarity with all possible management options in order to provide the highest degree of patient satisfaction. Commercially available denture adhesives are products that have the capacity to enhance treatment outcome. This reality is compellingly underescored by two facts: (1) consumer surveys reveal that approximately 33% of denture patients purchase and use one or more denture adhesive products in a given year; and (2) denture adhesive sales in the U.S. exceeded $200 million in 1994 (12% more than for denture cleaners, and nearly twice the spending on dental floss). Dentists need to know about denture adhesives for two reasons: (1) to be able to educate all denture patients about the advantages, disadvantages, and uses of the product, because adhesives are a widely-used dental material and patients rightfully expect their dentists to be accurately informed about over-the-counter oral care products; and (2) to identify those patients for whom such a product is advisable and/or necessary for a satisfactory denture wearing experience7.

Complete denture treatment needs to be customized for each patient’s particular needs. Successful treatment combines exemplary technique, effective patient rapport and education, and familiarity with all possible management options in order to provide the highest degree of patient satisfaction. Commercially available denture adhesives are products that have the capacity to enhance treatment outcome. This reality is compellingly underescored by two facts: (1) consumer surveys reveal that approximately 33% of denture patients purchase and use one or more denture adhesive products in a given year; and (2) denture adhesive sales in the U.S. exceeded $200 million in 1994 (12% more than for denture cleaners, and nearly twice the spending on dental floss). Dentists need to know about denture adhesives for two reasons: (1) to be able to educate all denture patients about the advantages, disadvantages, and uses of the product, because adhesives are a widely-used dental material and patients rightfully expect their dentists to be accurately informed about over-the-counter oral care products; and (2) to identify those patients for whom such a product is advisable and/or necessary for a satisfactory denture wearing experience7.

Components and Mechanism(s) of Action

Denture adhesives augment the same retentive mechanisms already operating when a denture is worn. They enhance retention through optimizing interfacial forces by: 1) increasing the adhesive and cohesive properties and viscosity of the medium lying between the denture and its basal seat; and 2) eliminating voids between the denture base and its basal seat. Adhesives (or, more accurately, the hydrated material that is formed when an adhesive comes into contact with saliva or water) are agents that stick readily to both the tissue surface of the denture and to the mucosal surface of the basal seat. Furthermore, since hydrated adhesives are more cohesive than saliva, physical forces intrinsic to the interposed adhesive medium resist the pull more successfully than would similar forces within saliva. The material increases the viscosity of the saliva with which it mixes, and the hydrated material swells in the presence of saliva/water and flows under pressure. Voids between the denture base and bearing tissues are therefore obliterated.

Denture adhesive materials in use prior to the early 1960’s were based on vegetable gums–such as karaya, tragacanth, xanthan, and acacia–that display modest, non-ionic adhesion to both denture and mucosa, and possessed very little cohesive strength. Gum-based adhesives (still commercially available) are highly water soluble, particularly in hot liquids such as coffee, tea, and soups, and therefore wash out readily from beneath dentures. Allergic reactions have been reported to karaya (and to the paraben preservative that the vegetable derivatives require), and formulations with karaya impart a marked odor reminiscent of acetic acid. Overall, the adhesive performance of the vegetable gum-based materials is short-lived and relatively unsatisfactory.

Synthetic materials presently dominate the denture adhesive market. The most popular and successful products consist of mixtures of the salts of short-acting (carboxymethylcellulose or “CMC”) and long-acting (poly[vinyl methyl ether maleate], or “gantrez”) polymers. In the presence of water, CMC hydrates and displays quick-onset ionic adherence to both dentures and mucous epithelium. The original fluid increases its viscosity and CMC increases in volume, thereby eliminating voids between prosthesis and basal seat. These two actions markedly enhance the interfacial forces acting on the denture. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (“povidone”) is another, less-commonly used agent that behaves like CMC. Over a more protracted time course than necessary for the onset of hydration of CMC, gantrez salts hydrate and increase adherence and viscosity. The “long-acting” (i.e, less soluble) gantrez salts also display molecular cross-linking, resulting in a measurable increase in cohesive behavior. This effect is significantly more pronounced and longer lived in calcium-zinc gantrez formulations than in calcium-sodium gantrez. Eventually all the polymers become fully solubilized and washed out by saliva; this elimination is hastened by the presence of hot liquid.

Other components of denture adhesive products impart particular physical attributes to the formulations. Petrolatum, mineral oil, and polyethylene oxide are included in creams to bind the materials and to make their placement easier. Silicone dioxide and calcium stearate are used in powders to minimize clumping. Menthol and peppermint oils are used for flavoring, red dye for color, and sodium borate and methyl- or poly-paraben as preservatives.

Indications and Contraindications

Scientific evidence favoring the support of routine and safe use of adhesives is lacking. Yet clinical experience indicates that prudent use of adhesives to enhance the retentive qualities of well made complete dentures is sound clinical judgment. Denture adhesives are indicated when well made complete dentures do not satisfy a patient’s perceived retention and stability expectations. Irrespective of the underlying reasons(s) for a patient’s reported dissatisfaction–psychological, occupational, morphological, functional, etc.–the dentist must recognize that a patient’s judgment of the treatment outcome is what defines prosthodontic success. Such maladaptive patients are clearly candidates for an implant supported prosthesis. But health, financial, or other considerations can preclude this, and then a well organized protocol of functional “do’s and don’t’s” may be the best palliative measure the professional can offer. Specific patient populations who can benefit from this strategy include patients with salivary dysfunction or neurological disorders, and those who have undergone resective surgical or traumatic modifications of the oral cavity.

Patients who suffer from xerostomia due to medication side effects, a history of head and neck irradiation, systemic disease or disease of the salivary glands, have great difficulty managing complete dentures due to impaired retention and an increased tendency for ulceration of the bearing tissues. The use of denture adhesive can compensate for the retention that is lacking in the absence of healthy saliva, and can mitigate the onset of oral ulcerations that result from frequent dislodgments. Xerostomic patients must be educated, however, that the adhesive-bearing denture will need to be deliberately moistened (e.g., with water from the tap) before it is seated in the otherwise dry mouth, in order to initiate the actions of the material.

Several neurological diseases can complicate the use of complete dentures, but adhesive may help to overcome the impediments imposed. Cerebrovascular accident (stroke) may render part of the oral cavity insensitive to tactile sensation, or partially or wholly paralyze oral musculature. Adhesives can assist in helping these patients accommodate to new dentures or to prostheses that were fabricated prior to the stroke but that the patient is now unable to manage due to lost sensory feedback and neuromuscular control. Orofacial dyskinesia is a prominent side effect of phenothiazine-class tranquilizers (e.g., fluphenazine, trifluoperazine, thioridazine or thiothixine), other neuroleptics (e.g., haloperidol), and even gastrointestinal medications (e.g., prochlorperazine, metoclopramide). This movement disorder, sometimes termed “tardive dyskinesia” because it is often a late-onset side effect of dopamine-blocking drugs, is characterized by exaggerated, uncontrollable muscular actions of the tongue, cheeks, lips and mandible. In such situations, denture retention, stability, and function may be a virtual impossibility without adjunctive retention, such as that made possible with denture adhesive.

Patients who have undergone resective surgery for removal of oral neoplasia, or those who have lost intraoral structures and integrity due to trauma, may have significant difficulty in functioning with a tissue-borne prosthesis unless denture adhesive is employed, even if rotational undercuts have been surgically created to resist displacement of the prosthesis.

It must be emphasized that a denture adhesive is not indicated for the retention of improperly fabricated or poorly fitting prostheses.

Patient Education

It is mandatory that dentists educate denture patients about denture adhesives–their use, abuse, advantages, disadvantages, and available choices. The major information resource for a patient should be the dentist and not magazine and television advertisements, or the testimonials of relatives and acquaintances.

The choice between cream and powder is largely subjective, but certain facts may underscore a patient’s selection. Powder formulations, as a rule, do not confer the same degree of “hold”, nor do their effects last as long, in comparison to comparable cream formulations. However powders can be used in smaller quantities, are generally easier to clean out of dentures and off tissues, and are not perceived as “messy” by patients. Furthermore, the initial “hold” for powders is achieved sooner than it is with cream formulations.

Obtaining the greatest advantage from the use of an adhesive product is dependent on its proper usage. For powder and cream products, the least amount of material that is effective should be used. This is approximately 0.5 to 1.5 g per denture unit (more for larger alveolar ridges, less for smaller ones). For powders, the clean prosthesis should be moistened and then a thin, even coating of the adhesive sprayed onto the tissue surface of the denture. The excess is shaken off, and the prosthesis inserted and seated firmly. If the patient suffers from inadequate or absent saliva, the sprayed denture should be moistened lightly with water before being inserted. For creams, two approaches are possible. Most manufacturers recommend placement of thin beads of the adhesive in the depth of the dried denture in the incisor and molar regions, and, in the maxillary unit, an antero-posterior bead along the mid-palate. However, more even distribution of the material can be achieved if small spots of cream are placed at 5 mm intervals throughout the fitting surface of the dried denture. Regardless of the pattern selected, the denture is then inserted and seated firmly. As with powders, use of denture adhesive cream by the xerostomia patient requires that the adhesive material be moistened with water prior to inserting the denture.

Patients must be instructed that daily removal of adhesive product from the tissue surfaces of the denture is an essential requirement for the use of the material. Removal is facilitated by letting the prosthesis soak in water or soaking solution overnight, during which the product will be fully solubilized and can then be readily rinsed off. If soaking is not possible before new adhesive material needs to be placed, removal is facilitated by running hot water over the tissue surface of the denture while scrubbing with a suitable, hard-bristle denture brush. Adhesive that is adherent to the alveolar ridges and palate is best removed by rinsing with warm or hot water, and then firmly wiping the area with gauze or a washcloth saturated with hot water.

Finally, patients need to be educated about the limitations of denture adhesive. Discomfort will not be resolved by placing a “cushioning layer” of adhesive under the denture. In fact, pain or soreness signals a need for professional management. Gradual increase in the quantity of adhesive required for acceptable fit of the denture is also a clear signal to seek professional care. In all cases, denture patients need to be recalled annually for oral mucosal evaluation and prosthesis assessment, but they also need to be educated about the warning signs that should alert them to seek professional attention between the check-ups.

Did you every wonder why that after wearing Dentures 2-3 years your Denturesbecome Loose and Irritating. That’s because of your Hard Plastic Dentures.

After 2-3 years of wearing Hard Plastic Dentures your Gums will start to wear down enough to causeyour Dentures to become Loose because of loss of suction. Your Dentures are much harder than your Gums so what do you think will wear first, your Gums of course.

Whem your Gums wear down just a little it will leave a gap between your Gumsand Dentures causing and air pocket to where your Dentures won’t seal anymore and will become Loose and Irritating.

This is the main reason soft liners were perfected to HELP STOP GUM SHRINKAGE! Some soft liners have a resilient texture (bounce back elasticity)stays Soft but Firm to help Save your Gums from Wear Tear of your Hard Plastic Dentures.

As long as you Reline your Dentures with a soft liner your Gums won’t Shrink to any large degree. If your Gums don’t Shrink you will always be able to wear Dentures with Satisfaction.

Department of Removable Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry,
University of Tokushima, Japan.

This study examined the effect of a soft denture liner on the distribution of stresses in the denture-supporting structures. Dentures without a linear and with three configurations of a soft liner were simulated by using a two-dimensional viscoelastic finite-element stress analysis. The stress intensity at functional force-bearing areas decreased when a soft denture liner was used. However, the stresses in the bone increased remarkably up to 3.0 seconds after loading. Because of the time-dependent effect of stresses applied to soft denture liners, denture patients who clench or brux may not benefit as greatly from soft denture liners. The study indicates that viscoelastic finite-element analysis is helpful for evaluating soft denture liners. Soft denture liners appear to be useful for improving the stress distribution in the supporting structures under dentures and in turn causing less gum loss.

All About Dentures

Giving You a Reason to Smile

Dentures-upper-and-lower

A new set of pearly whites giving you a reason to smile.

Dentures, or false teeth, are fixed or removable replacements for teeth. Tooth replacement becomes necessary when the tooth and its roots have been irreparably damaged, and the tooth has been lost or must be removed. Dentists have long known that a missing permanent tooth should always be replaced or else the teeth on either side of the space gradually tilt toward the gap, and the teeth in the opposite jaw begin to move toward the space.

 

There are several standard forms of tooth replacement in modern dentistry. A full denture is made to restore both the teeth and the underlying bone when all the teeth are missing in an arch. A smaller version is the fixed partial denture, also known as a fixed bridge, which can be used if generally healthy teeth are present adjacent to the space where the tooth or teeth have been lost. The partial is anchored to the surrounding teeth by attachment to crowns, or caps, that are affixed to the healthy teeth. A removable partial denture is used to replace multiple missing teeth when there are insufficient natural teeth to support a fixed bridge. This device rests on the soft tissues of the jaws, and is held in place with metal clasps or supports. Dental implants are the latest tooth-replacement technology. They allow prosthetic teeth to be implanted directly in the bones of the jaw.

 

History

Historically, a variety of materials have been used to replace lost teeth. Animal teeth and pieces of bone were among the earliest of these primitive replacement materials. Two such rudimentary false teeth (probably molars) were found wrapped in gold wire in the ancient Egyptian tomb of El Gigel. In the last few hundred years, artificial teeth have been fashioned from natural substances such as ivory, porcelain, and even platinum. These comparatively crude prototypes of earlier times were carved or forged by hand in an attempt to mimic the appearance and function of natural teeth. Such early denture workmanship is exemplified by George Washington’s famous wooden teeth.

 

Modern technology has offered considerable advances in the materials used to make artificial teeth and improved techniques for affixing them in the mouth. Synthetic plastic resins and lightweight metal alloys have made teeth more durable and natural looking. Better design has resulted in dentures that provide more comfortable and efficient chewing. In the 1980s technology was developed to create the next generation of dentures, which are permanently anchored to the bones in the jaw. These new dentures, known as dental implants, are prepared by specialized dentists called denturists.

 

Raw Materials

 

Teeth

Most artificial teeth are made from high quality acrylic resins, which make them stronger and more attractive than was once possible. The acrylic resins are relatively wear-resistant, and teeth made from these materials are expected to last between five and eight years. Porcelain is also used as a tooth material because it looks more like natural tooth enamel. Porcelain is used particularly for upper front teeth, which are the most visible. However, the pressure of biting and chewing with porcelain teeth can wear away and damage natural teeth. Therefore, porcelain teeth should not be used in partial dentures where they will contact natural teeth during chewing.

 

Mounting frame

Artificial teeth are seated in a metal and plastic mount, which holds them in place in the mouth during chewing. The mount consists of a frame to provide its form and a saddle-shaped portion that is shaped to conform to the patient’s gums and palate. This design allows for comfort and optimizes the dentures’ appearance. Frames are typically constructed of metal alloys such as nobilium or chromium. The latest generations of plastic materials used in dentures are virtually indestructible and can be easily adjusted or repaired with a special kit at the dentist’s office. These materials are also ultra lightweight and can eliminate problems in patients who are allergic to acrylic materials or who are bothered by the metallic taste left by a metal frame.

 

Design

Every individual’s mouth is different, and each denture must be custom designed to fit perfectly and to look good. The latest methodology used in denture design, known as dentogenics, is based on research conducted in Switzerland in the early 1950s, which developed standards for designing teeth to fit specific smile lines, mouth shapes, and personalities. These standards are based on such factors as mouth size and shape, skull size, age, sex, skin color, and hair color. For example, through proper denture design, patients can be given a younger smile by simply making teeth longer than they normally would be at that patient’s age. This rejuvenation effect is possible because a person’s teeth wear down over time; slightly increasing the length of the front teeth can create a more youthful appearance.

 

The Manufacturing
Process

The manufacturing process begins with a preliminary impression of the patient’s mouth, which is usually done in wax. This impression is used to prepare a diagnostic cast. While making the impression, the dentist applies pressure to the soft tissues to simulate biting force and extends the borders of the mold to adjacent toothless areas to allow the dentures to better adapt to the gums. Once an appropriate preliminary cast has been obtained, the final cast is cast from gypsum, a stone-like product. The final mold is inspected and approved before using it to manufacture the teeth.

After the mold has been cast, it is filled with acrylic resin to form the denture. The mold is prepared with a release agent prior to adding the resin to ensure that the hardened acrylic can be easily removed once the process is completed. A sheet of separating film between the acrylic and the model is also helpful in this regard. The denturist then mixes the appropriate resin compounds in liquid form. Upon drying, the resin hardens to a durable finish. This resin mixture is packed into the mold, while a vertical vise packs it tightly. At this point the model can be inspected to ensure it is filled properly, and if necessary additional resin can be added. Instead of vice packing, certain types of acrylic may be poured into the mold. This method is more prone to air bubbles than hand packing. Once the mold is packed to the denturist’s satisfaction, it is heated to initiate the chemical reaction which causes the resin to harden. This part of the process may take up to eight hours.

After the heating is done and the mold has cooled, the mold is broken apart so the denture may be removed. The denture is then put in the model of the patient’s mouth to ensure that it fits and that the bite is good. Because of the number of processing steps there may be a slight discrepancy in the fit. Usually just a minor grinding and smoothing of surfaces is all that is necessary to make the denture fit correctly. At this point, if the denture is the removable type, it is ready for use. Implants require additional preparatory steps before they can be used. The denturist must drill the appropriate holes in the jaw bone and attach an anchor. After three to six months, when the hole has healed and the anchor is set in place, a small second surgical procedure is necessary to expose the implant and connect a metal rod to it that will be used to hold the crown or bridge. Finally, the replacement tooth is attached to the rod, where it is held firmly in place.

 

Quality Control

Good quality control is critical to ensure the denture fits and looks natural in the patient’s mouth. No two dentures will be alike; even two sets of dentures made for the same person will not be exactly alike because they are manufactured in custom molds that must be broken in order to extract the denture. After the molding process is completed, the fine details of the denture are added by hand. This step is necessary to ensure the teeth look natural and fit properly.

 

The quality of the denture’s fit can be controlled in two ways. Relining is a process by which the sides of the denture that contacts the gums are resurfaced. Such adjustments are necessary because the dental impressions used to make dentures cause the gums to move. As a result new dentures may not fit properly. Also, over time bone and gum tissues can shift, altering the fit of the denture. Rebasing is used to refit a denture by replacing or adding to the base material of the saddle. This process is required when the denture base degenerates or no longer extends into the proper gum areas. Most patients require relining or rebasing approximately five to eight years after initial placement of the dentures.

 

Byproducts/Waste

Denture manufacture generates little waste other than a minimal amount of the gypsum and plaster materials used in mold making. There is also little excess of the acrylic resins used in crafting the teeth and mounts. Large quantities of wasted materials are not generally produced since dentures are hand crafted and not mass produced on a production line.

 

The Future

Dentistry has shared in many of the successes experienced in other areas of science and medicine. For example, improved surgical techniques have led to the development of implants. Advances in polymer chemistry have resulted in improved resins that are more durable and better looking. However, other materials used in dental techniques still require significant improvement. For example, the adhesives used in bonding artificial constructs to natural teeth research must be improved because a high proportion of these bonding processes are not successful. Similarly, improved resins are necessary to make dentures even more comfortable and longer lasting. As breakthroughs are made in related fields of chemistry, they will be incorporated into denture manufacturing.

LOOSE DENTURES?

Easy-to-use Professional Denture Reline Kits for Home Use

Perma Soft Denture Reline Kit

loose-dentures

Don’t Keep Your Dentures in a Glass. Wear them with a Soft Denture Reline Kit.

ABOUT DENTURES AND LOOSE DENTURES

Dentures! What an invention! Dentures are artificial appliances that you can wear in your mouth to take the place of your natural teeth. Great-fitting dentures mainly depend on your gum structure and how your dentures were ma

First, we will discuss Loose Dentures. There is nothing worse than having loose dentures in your mouth. Loose dentures will cause sore spots by moving around all the time and cause your teeth to clack, thus causing embarrassment to yourself. If you’re like most people you will put your dentures up for a day or so to allow your gums to heal. This is a bad idea. Leaving your dentures out of your mouth for any certain amount of time will cause you to leave them where they’re at and you’ll most likely quit wearing them. This is especially true for the lower dentures. People just don’t like wearing lower dentures because they don’t fit as tight as the upper dentures. Upper dentures have a roof in your mouth for suction. Lower dentures just sit on the ridge of the lower gum.

Loose dentures can be relined by your Dentist or by you at home with Perma Soft Professional Denture Reline Kit. By clicking on the links above you can professionally reline your dentures at home for only $19 until you can see your dentist. Check out the above links for more information on our home reline kits that provide comfort and satisfaction for your mouth until you can get an appointment with your dentist. . If you want a comfortable cushiony denture reline with long-time wear, then the above links have just what you’re looking for. Perma Soft is specially formulated for loose dentures and problem denture wearers.

If you have loose dentures and are having a problem wearing them you should have it taken care of as soon as possible so you can get back into the routine of wearing your dentures. The longer you leave your dentures out, especially the lower one, the harder it is to get back to wearing dentures. So, whatever problem you’re having with your dentures, get them fixed as soon as possible.

WARNING: Although Perma Soft lasts up to 2 years, product for temporary use until you can see a dentist.

WEARING DENTURES FOR THE FIRST TIME

Wearing dentures for the first time can be a horrible experience. There is no room in your mouth for food, you can’t chew properly, and you can’t talk without slurring your words. Don’t worry! All people wearing dentures for the first time go through this and I will give you some helpful hints on wearing your new dentures later on. Dentures are nothing more than hard plastic objects molded to fit your gum structure. That’s all they are, hard plastic dentures nothing more nothing less. So getting adjusted to two pieces of hard plastic dentures is not an easy chore.

First, you have to make your mind up whether or not you’re going to wear dentures before you get them. Second, the biggest and most important thing about getting adjusted to wearing dentures is TIME. Time is your most important factor in wearing dentures for the first time.

Wearing dentures, talking with dentures, eating with dentures and just plain getting use to having dentures in your mouth ALL TAKE TIME. The longer you have your denture or dentures in your mouth, the better your dentures will feel. The better your dentures feel, then you are getting use to your dentures. But all this take time. Each day that goes by will make you feel better about your dentures.

I have made dentures for 30 years and I still have no idea why someone hasn’t come up with a soft pliable denture that would feel more comfortable in your mouth. I do know pliable dentures are being tested but there having a problem keeping the teeth on the dentures from falling out. I am positive in the next few years there will be flexible dentures on the market with a high price tag.

HELPFUL HINTS FOR DENTURES

1. take small bites with your dentures
2. take your TIME starting out with new dentures.
3. just play around with your dentures for the first couple days and don’t try to get a meal in a restaurant.
4. to speak more clearly with your dentures – READ out loud and when you hear yourself mispronounce a word go back and say it over and over until you get it right and go back to reading.
5. before cleaning your dentures fill sink with a little water first that way if your drop your dentures they will hit the water and won’t break.
6. sleep with your new dentures the first few nights. This will help you adjust to them faster.

DENTURES-PROBLEMS-CAUSES

Dentures cause your speech to be—read out loud or upper dentures could be to thick in roof of mouth.

Dentures make clacking-clickin—dentures are to loose, your bite is not correct, or your not use to dentures yet.

Dentures become loose & irritating— dentures need to be relined and could be caused by loss of weight.

Dentures & sore spots—- loose dentures cause sore spots and dentures that are to long in certain areas.

Dentures gag you— dentures are too long usually the upper denture is to long in the back (roof) of denture by your throat.

Dentures & gum shrinkage— as dentures wear out so do your gums, dentures are harder than your gums so in time they wear.

What are loose dentures and how do they become loose in the first place?, Loose Dentures can be cause by losing weight, getting your dentures made to soon, and wear and tear of your hard plastic dentures on your gums year after year.

Contact us Anytime

Home

Back To Top